private training

Online review of working out with Rachel Rettman

Rachel Fitness, Pilates, Workplace Wellness Leave a comment   , , , , , , , , ,

ballet feet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check out this online review of a session provided by Rachel Rettman for another fitness inustry professional

WELLO BLOG POST – PILATES/BARRE WORKOUT REVIEW

The best reviews come from those with lots of experience in the given area; in this case, getting a rave review from another fitness instructor is top notch!  To be able to help someone who knows what she is doing to get out of her comfort zone, try something new, and then receive great feedback is invaluable.  While we all love positive client feedback, and that NEVER gets old or tiresome, raves from other like-minded professionals lend an aspect of additional credibility.

Thanks for the wonderful feedback, Judy Kuan.

Check out both Rachel Rettman and Judy Kuan on Wello.com!


Fitness and Fashion Converge!

Rachel Fitness, Lifestyle, Nutrition, Pilates Leave a comment   , , , , , , ,

Tomorrow is the June Portland First Thursday in the Pearl…and Leanna NYC is featuring local artists, musicians and fitness!

Rachel Rettman – Fitness. Nutrition. Lifestyle. will be raffling off private training, nutrition consultations, and free classes!  This is a great opportunity to ask fitness and nutrition questions, meet Rachel, and mingle with fun people.

More about the ‘LeannaNYC Keepin’ it Local First Thursday’ event can be found on Facebook

Get fit for those skinny jeans, find awesome summer fashions, and of course drink free booze.  Summer is back…so is First Thursday!


Tipping Trainers

Rachel Fitness, Lifestyle, Money, Pilates, Wisdom Leave a comment   , , , , , , , , ,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tipping etiquette is a touchy and debatable topic, but the question of tipping personal trainers, Yoga & Pilates instructors, etc. is an issue worth addressing.

While tipping is technically never required, it is something we do to express gratitude for a job well done, and ultimately it is an engrained part of American culture (others as well, to greater and lesser extent).  Overall Americans are generous tippers.

It is standard to tip hair stylists, massage therapists, aestheticians, and other one-on-one service providers between 15% and 20%.  These service providers have undergone special training and are creating a (hopefully) positive experience that clients both want and need.  When it comes to trainers, private exercise instructors and the likes, in theory it should be no different.  Once again this is a specialized individual whom, at least in the case of a comprehensively trained Pilates instructor, has spent many hundreds of hours learning and honing his or her skill set.  A private session is taking place, and individualized attention to specific needs, conditions, concerns, and more are factoring into the interaction.

If you think about it, physical trainers are facilitating physical wellness; from a physiological, purely medical perspective this is very important to living a long, healthy life.  Indeed haircuts and facials are important and beloved services, but someone could suffer from serious and life-threatening conditions and find help through something like Pilates or Yoga (burn fat, build muscle); no one ever died from not enough hair cuts or too few massages.  Having said that, one would think a client would LOVE tipping the health instructor who is making life more livable.

It is also important to consider things like rental space and other costs that instructors incur.  Just like many hair stylists split their earnings with the salon, instructors give a (sometimes very large) percentage of earnings to the studio they use.  Or, if employed by a studio, work at a rate that is often far less than is paid by the customer.

Bottom line, as a society we are not conditioned to tip trainers in the same way as we are hair stylist, massage therapists, etc. and yet these services fall within similar categories.   If you see an instructor 3 times a week a smaller tip is certainly understandable, but overall a Pilates or Yoga instructor or Personal Trainer working in a private setting (versus a big box gym with certain policies) should be viewed like a ‘body’ stylist and tipped accordingly.  Remember, personal exercise instructors/trainers are not dieticians or acupuncturists; those are medical providers and often are dealt with and paid for by insurance companies.

Next time you take a private Pilates or Yoga lesson for $70 consider giving the instructor $10 -$15.  Of course there is no need to tip in group classes – the point is to express gratitude for a customized, individual service.

 

 


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